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(Mini Tutorial) How I do my Foundation Piecing Quilted Pouch

Hello again,

I hope you all had a great weekend. Well, I did. Last Saturday the boys went to school picnic and would be back by evening. That means I have a whole day and afternoon free. Woohoo!

I was working on one custom order of mini sling bag, but my mind kept wandering to the bag under my computer table. The Pandora bag (not box) that hold my  Quilted Bag Kit from my bestie, Winda. She gave it to me 2 years ago when we met in Jakarta. The kit was a bag kit and she already started making 2 or 3 blocks. So I put away what I was working on and pulled out the bag, sorting out the pieces, interfacings, batting, etc. That was on Friday evening. The next day, after the boys were out of the house and a quick housework,  I started piecing the blocks and here's my pouch. 


At first, I thought of making a tote bag after I saw this Instagram Post. Then decided to do less ambitious one first.

Here's what I learned during the weekends. 

Many blogs wrote about using Freezer Paper for foundation piecing, which is not available here in North East India (or even India for that matter). The kit (it's Japanese Craft Kit) used a fusible stabilizer which is a thicker version of what we called "pasting" in here.  That is a thin lightweight nonwoven fusible interfacing. So I tried using our own desi interfacing and it worked like a charm. Yay! I remake the pattern on my computer based on the original size and print it on the interfacing. I cut the interfacing slightly smaller than the A4 size paper, fuse it lightly on the paper and run it through the printer, et voila! No more tracing pattern one by one !! (it's the same method I used for this DIY Printed Label)


 I didn't really follow the pattern instructions. What I did as cutting a strip of fabrics that will be used and do it like quilt as you go method. 
First, lay the 1st piece of fabrics on the glue side of the interfacing, right sigh up. 


Then place Fabric No. 2 on top of fabric No.1 right side together matching the seam. Make sure that when you flip the fabric (no.2), it will cover the triangle no. 2 plus around 1/4" seam allowance. 


Flip it to the reverse side, pin and sew on the line 

Like this


Now open fabric no. 2 away from the seam and finger press. 

Trim fabric No. 2 so that it has 1/4" seam allowance. 

Continue in the same manner until you cover the template. Don't be discouraged when it looks ugly ^v^.


Because after you trim the excess fabrics you will get this pretty little blocks.

Reverse Side After trimming
Aren't they cute?
Front View

I almost proud of my self (well, I do actually) to be able to complete this. Paper Piecing is something that I always feel it's difficult and a lot of work. Especially if I have to trace the pattern one by one. 
After an hour here what I got!

Blocks size : 3 1/4" x 3 1/4" after trimming

After lunch and a quick nap, I started working on the pouch. I decided to do hand quilting. Hand quilting is one thing that I always want to do. I realized with the right batting, hand quilting is so easy to do. And if you have your fave Korean drama on, it's the better. It's like killing 2 birds with one stone. LOL. 

Hand Quilting with Gutterman Cotton Thread
I didn't tear off the interfacing since I am making a pouch and I love a slightly structured pouch, so the interfacing will work out great. I just needed to add the batting. 
Front Side 
I used Sevenberry fabric for the back of the pouch. Isn't that lovely? I picked up the fabric during my visit to Indonesia last year. 


Sometimes, we have to face our fears and just do it. Sometimes things look difficult and complicated until you actually do it.

So, what are you making this week? 

Until then,

Happy Sewing, 

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